[][src]Struct heapless::spsc::Queue

pub struct Queue<T, N, U = usize, C = MultiCore>(_)
where
    N: ArrayLength<T>,
    U: Uxx,
    C: XCore
;

A statically allocated single producer single consumer queue with a capacity of N elements

IMPORTANT: To get better performance use a capacity that is a power of 2 (e.g. U16, U32, etc.).

By default spsc::Queue will use usize integers to hold the indices to its head and tail. For small queues usize indices may be overkill. However, spsc::Queue's index type is generic and can be changed to u8 or u16 to reduce its footprint. The easiest to construct a spsc::Queue with a smaller index type is to use the u8 and u16 constructors.

IMPORTANT: spsc::Queue<_, _, u8> has a maximum capacity of 255 elements; spsc::Queue<_, _, u16> has a maximum capacity of 65535 elements.

spsc::Queue also comes in a single core variant. This variant can be created using the following constructors: u8_sc, u16_sc, usize_sc and new_sc. This variant is unsafe to create because the programmer must make sure that the queue's consumer and producer endpoints (if split) are kept on a single core for their entire lifetime.

Methods

impl<T, N, U, C> Queue<T, N, U, C> where
    N: ArrayLength<T>,
    U: Uxx,
    C: XCore, 
[src]

pub fn split<'rb>(
    &'rb mut self
) -> (Producer<'rb, T, N, U, C>, Consumer<'rb, T, N, U, C>)
[src]

Splits a statically allocated queue into producer and consumer end points

impl<T, N, U, C> Queue<T, N, U, C> where
    N: ArrayLength<T>,
    U: Uxx,
    C: XCore, 
[src]

pub fn capacity(&self) -> U[src]

Returns the maximum number of elements the queue can hold

pub fn is_empty(&self) -> bool[src]

Returns true if the queue has a length of 0

Important traits for Iter<'a, T, N, U, C>
pub fn iter(&self) -> Iter<T, N, U, C>[src]

Iterates from the front of the queue to the back

Important traits for IterMut<'a, T, N, U, C>
pub fn iter_mut(&mut self) -> IterMut<T, N, U, C>[src]

Returns an iterator that allows modifying each value.

impl<T, N> Queue<T, N, usize, MultiCore> where
    N: ArrayLength<T>, 
[src]

pub fn new() -> Self[src]

impl<T, N> Queue<T, N, usize, SingleCore> where
    N: ArrayLength<T>, 
[src]

pub unsafe fn new_sc() -> Self[src]

impl<T, N> Queue<T, N, u8, MultiCore> where
    N: ArrayLength<T>, 
[src]

pub fn u8() -> Self[src]

Creates an empty queue with a fixed capacity of N

impl<T, N> Queue<T, N, u8, SingleCore> where
    N: ArrayLength<T>, 
[src]

pub unsafe fn u8_sc() -> Self[src]

Creates an empty queue with a fixed capacity of N (single core variant)

impl<T, N, C> Queue<T, N, u8, C> where
    N: ArrayLength<T>,
    C: XCore, 
[src]

pub fn peek(&self) -> Option<&T>[src]

Returns a reference to the item in the front of the queue without dequeuing, or None if the queue is empty.

Examples

use heapless::spsc::Queue;
use heapless::consts::*;

let mut queue: Queue<u8, U235, _> = Queue::u8();
let (mut producer, mut consumer) = queue.split();
assert_eq!(None, consumer.peek());
producer.enqueue(1);
assert_eq!(Some(&1), consumer.peek());
assert_eq!(Some(1), consumer.dequeue());
assert_eq!(None, consumer.peek());

pub fn dequeue(&mut self) -> Option<T>[src]

Returns the item in the front of the queue, or None if the queue is empty

pub fn enqueue(&mut self, item: T) -> Result<(), T>[src]

Adds an item to the end of the queue

Returns back the item if the queue is full

pub unsafe fn enqueue_unchecked(&mut self, item: T)[src]

Adds an item to the end of the queue, without checking if it's full

Unsafety

If the queue is full this operation will leak a value (T's destructor won't run on the value that got overwritten by item), and will allow the dequeue operation to create a copy of item, which could result in T's destructor running on item twice.

pub fn len(&self) -> u8[src]

Returns the number of elements in the queue

impl<T, N> Queue<T, N, u16, MultiCore> where
    N: ArrayLength<T>, 
[src]

pub fn u16() -> Self[src]

Creates an empty queue with a fixed capacity of N

impl<T, N> Queue<T, N, u16, SingleCore> where
    N: ArrayLength<T>, 
[src]

pub unsafe fn u16_sc() -> Self[src]

Creates an empty queue with a fixed capacity of N (single core variant)

impl<T, N, C> Queue<T, N, u16, C> where
    N: ArrayLength<T>,
    C: XCore, 
[src]

pub fn peek(&self) -> Option<&T>[src]

Returns a reference to the item in the front of the queue without dequeuing, or None if the queue is empty.

Examples

use heapless::spsc::Queue;
use heapless::consts::*;

let mut queue: Queue<u8, U235, _> = Queue::u8();
let (mut producer, mut consumer) = queue.split();
assert_eq!(None, consumer.peek());
producer.enqueue(1);
assert_eq!(Some(&1), consumer.peek());
assert_eq!(Some(1), consumer.dequeue());
assert_eq!(None, consumer.peek());

pub fn dequeue(&mut self) -> Option<T>[src]

Returns the item in the front of the queue, or None if the queue is empty

pub fn enqueue(&mut self, item: T) -> Result<(), T>[src]

Adds an item to the end of the queue

Returns back the item if the queue is full

pub unsafe fn enqueue_unchecked(&mut self, item: T)[src]

Adds an item to the end of the queue, without checking if it's full

Unsafety

If the queue is full this operation will leak a value (T's destructor won't run on the value that got overwritten by item), and will allow the dequeue operation to create a copy of item, which could result in T's destructor running on item twice.

pub fn len(&self) -> u16[src]

Returns the number of elements in the queue

impl<T, N> Queue<T, N, usize, MultiCore> where
    N: ArrayLength<T>, 
[src]

pub fn usize() -> Self[src]

Creates an empty queue with a fixed capacity of N

impl<T, N> Queue<T, N, usize, SingleCore> where
    N: ArrayLength<T>, 
[src]

pub unsafe fn usize_sc() -> Self[src]

Creates an empty queue with a fixed capacity of N (single core variant)

impl<T, N, C> Queue<T, N, usize, C> where
    N: ArrayLength<T>,
    C: XCore, 
[src]

pub fn peek(&self) -> Option<&T>[src]

Returns a reference to the item in the front of the queue without dequeuing, or None if the queue is empty.

Examples

use heapless::spsc::Queue;
use heapless::consts::*;

let mut queue: Queue<u8, U235, _> = Queue::u8();
let (mut producer, mut consumer) = queue.split();
assert_eq!(None, consumer.peek());
producer.enqueue(1);
assert_eq!(Some(&1), consumer.peek());
assert_eq!(Some(1), consumer.dequeue());
assert_eq!(None, consumer.peek());

pub fn dequeue(&mut self) -> Option<T>[src]

Returns the item in the front of the queue, or None if the queue is empty

pub fn enqueue(&mut self, item: T) -> Result<(), T>[src]

Adds an item to the end of the queue

Returns back the item if the queue is full

pub unsafe fn enqueue_unchecked(&mut self, item: T)[src]

Adds an item to the end of the queue, without checking if it's full

Unsafety

If the queue is full this operation will leak a value (T's destructor won't run on the value that got overwritten by item), and will allow the dequeue operation to create a copy of item, which could result in T's destructor running on item twice.

pub fn len(&self) -> usize[src]

Returns the number of elements in the queue

Trait Implementations

impl<T, N, U, C> Debug for Queue<T, N, U, C> where
    N: ArrayLength<T>,
    T: Debug,
    U: Uxx,
    C: XCore, 
[src]

impl<T, N, U, C, N2, U2, C2> PartialEq<Queue<T, N2, U2, C2>> for Queue<T, N, U, C> where
    T: PartialEq,
    N: ArrayLength<T>,
    U: Uxx,
    C: XCore,
    N2: ArrayLength<T>,
    U2: Uxx,
    C2: XCore, 
[src]

impl<T, N, U, C> Eq for Queue<T, N, U, C> where
    T: Eq,
    N: ArrayLength<T>,
    U: Uxx,
    C: XCore, 
[src]

impl<T, N, U, C> Drop for Queue<T, N, U, C> where
    N: ArrayLength<T>,
    U: Uxx,
    C: XCore, 
[src]

impl<T, N, U, C> Hash for Queue<T, N, U, C> where
    N: ArrayLength<T>,
    T: Hash,
    U: Uxx,
    C: XCore, 
[src]

impl<'a, T, N, U, C> IntoIterator for &'a Queue<T, N, U, C> where
    N: ArrayLength<T>,
    U: Uxx,
    C: XCore, 
[src]

type Item = &'a T

The type of the elements being iterated over.

type IntoIter = Iter<'a, T, N, U, C>

Which kind of iterator are we turning this into?

impl<'a, T, N, U, C> IntoIterator for &'a mut Queue<T, N, U, C> where
    N: ArrayLength<T>,
    U: Uxx,
    C: XCore, 
[src]

type Item = &'a mut T

The type of the elements being iterated over.

type IntoIter = IterMut<'a, T, N, U, C>

Which kind of iterator are we turning this into?

impl<T, N, C> Clone for Queue<T, N, u8, C> where
    T: Clone,
    N: ArrayLength<T>,
    C: XCore, 
[src]

impl<T, N, C> Clone for Queue<T, N, u16, C> where
    T: Clone,
    N: ArrayLength<T>,
    C: XCore, 
[src]

impl<T, N, C> Clone for Queue<T, N, usize, C> where
    T: Clone,
    N: ArrayLength<T>,
    C: XCore, 
[src]

impl<T, N, U, C> Hash for Queue<T, N, U, C> where
    N: ArrayLength<T>,
    T: Hash,
    U: Uxx,
    C: XCore, 
[src]

Auto Trait Implementations

impl<T, N, U, C> Unpin for Queue<T, N, U, C> where
    C: Unpin,
    U: Unpin,
    <N as ArrayLength<T>>::ArrayType: Unpin

impl<T, N, U, C> Send for Queue<T, N, U, C> where
    C: Send,
    T: Send

impl<T, N, U = usize, C = MultiCore> !Sync for Queue<T, N, U, C>

Blanket Implementations

impl<T> From<T> for T[src]

impl<T, U> TryFrom<U> for T where
    U: Into<T>, 
[src]

type Error = Infallible

The type returned in the event of a conversion error.

impl<T, U> Into<U> for T where
    U: From<T>, 
[src]

impl<T, U> TryInto<U> for T where
    U: TryFrom<T>, 
[src]

type Error = <U as TryFrom<T>>::Error

The type returned in the event of a conversion error.

impl<T> Borrow<T> for T where
    T: ?Sized
[src]

impl<T> BorrowMut<T> for T where
    T: ?Sized
[src]

impl<T> Any for T where
    T: 'static + ?Sized
[src]

impl<T> Same<T> for T[src]

type Output = T

Should always be Self